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Natural Toothpaste

Are Commercialized “Natural” Toothpastes so Natural?o-BRUSH-TEETH-facebook

Let’s talk about ingredients found in these toothpastes:  (Sugar Alcohols)

1.  Xylitol — “natural Sweetener” — it ferments the Gut –Yuck!  There is enough xylitol in two pieces of gum to kill a 100 gram rodent.  According to lab tests, a 100 gram rodent can be killed by approximately 1.65 grams of xylitol about half of the time.  There is no long-term safety data.

2.  Erythritol (Truvia) — poison for fruit flies — another sugar alcohol that is produced by the industrialized process of sugar hydrogenation with a heavy metal catalyst.  Erythritol is exclusively derived from corn and much if it is GMO corn.

Note:  While xylitol is poorly absorbed in the gut, erythritol is well absorbed but is poorly metabolized.

Metabolic acidosis can lead to acid reflux and an increased risk or danger to the larynx.  It also promotes dehydration and loss of electrolytes which increases a feeling of thirst.  Erythritol is a commonly used food additive approved by the Food & Drug Administration.  Oh My!

3.  Tee Tree Oil — a volatile oil from the native Australian evergreen, Melaleuca alternifolia.  This oil has active components like terpenes which make it a powerful antimicrobial capable of destroying bacteria on contact.  It can be toxic to pets and may cause toxic and allergic reactions in humans, especially  if swallowed.  Contact to the eyes, nose and mouth should be avoided.  Serious side effects include confusion, inability to walk, unsteadiness, rash, and hormonal imbalances.

In conclusion, I have found a recipe on Pinterest for homemade toothpaste on Crunchy Betty.  

The ingredients are:

6 tablespoons coconut oil

6 tablespoons baking soda

25 drops essential oils (I used Wild Orange by doTerra

1 teaspoon Natural Stevia (about 5 droppers full) for sweetening — Ingredients in it include: Purified/Active Water, Organic Stevia (Leaf) extract

Directions:

1.  Mix all ingredients together in a bowl.  I used my electric hand mixer on low first, then turned it up to get a light, creamy texture.

2.  Pour into small jars and put lid on until ready to use.

Getting out the toothpaste can be a little tricky, but you can use your toothbrush and dip into it; or you can use a clean popsicle stick.  Also a hair dye bottle with pointed tip can be used to store the toothpaste in.

We love how it makes our teeth and mouth feel after brushing gently.  You don’t want to brush so vigorously that you wear away your gums.  The brushing of teeth is to gently sweep out any and all food particles.  Then flossing in between each tooth and the ends is important for healthy teeth and gums.

Enjoy brushing your teeth with peace of mind and without damaging the good bacteria in your mouth!

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Probiotics

"yeo valley" recyclable "limite...

“yeo valley” recyclable “limited edition” cherry probiotic yogurt (Photo credit: osde8info)

Probiotics for Your Health!

What are Probiotics?  – from pro and biota meaning “for life”

They are live microorganisms which may provide a health benefit to you.  Bacteria have a reputation for causing disease so you might wonder why tossing down a few billion microbes of bacteria a day is good for your health.  We’re talking about Good Bacteria!” 

Why are Probiotics beneficial?

Scientific research suggests that probiotic bacteria can:

Improve digestive function

Help with side effects of antibiotic therapy

Help reduce the risk of certain acute and common infectious diseases

Improve tolerance to lactose

Enhance immune function

Probiotic supplementation are being recommended by digestive disease specialists because of the frustration from conventional medicine, such as irritable bowel syndrome.  Probiotic therapy can help treat several gastrointestinal ills, delay the development of allergies in children, and treat and prevent vaginal and urinary tract infections in women.  The best cases for probiotic therapy has been in the treatment of diarrhea by shortening the course of infectious diarrhea in infants and children.

Probiotic therapy may also help people with Crohn’s disease and Irritable Bowel Syndrome.  Because many disorders are so frustrating to treat in conventional medicine, many people are giving probiotics a try before opting for surgery.

Video from Council for Agricultural Science and Technology (CAST) examining probiotics launched today. Sponsored in part by CDRF, “Germs with a Positive Attitude” features Drs. Todd Klaenhammer and Mary Ellen Sanders.

If you or someone you know is experiencing any gastrointestinal issues, weakened immune system, allergies, infections, or chronic headaches, please call Health Life Institute at 801-317-1647.  We can help!

Sources:

California Dairy Research Foundation, usprobiotics.org

David Knight, Health Point Productions, Sherman Oaks, CA 91403, microwarriorsmovie

The Harvard Medical School Family Health Guide, “Health Benefits of Taking Probiotics,” 2000–2006 President & Fellows of Harvard College