Whole Body Vibration

What is WBV Good For?    

Many physical therapists and strength training coaches have started incorporating whole body vibration (WBV) into their therapy or coaching sessions.  The patient stands on the platform of the WBV Machine that provides constant vibration from gentle to challenging and which reverberates through the body.  Everyone is unique and the therapy or coaching sessions will be uniquely programmed according to the needs of the patient.  

Background:  

WBV first originated in Russia for their cosmonaut training to preserve muscle and bone mass in zero gravity conditions.  WBV is gaining confidence among health practitioners, especially for the athletic populations or people compromised by disease, age or disability.  

WBV is already employed extensively in Europe and Asia.  Practitioners in the United States are becoming more aware of its total benefits and therapeutic functions.  

How Does it Work?  Vibration therapy units are either motor-generated plates or vibrational models.  Motor-oriented units move in both horizontal and vertical planes.  This is beneficial for athletes who want to challenge multiple planes of motions, i.e., a golfer’s swing or the variations of a tennis player’s swing.  

Vibrational sound or piston models operate in the vertical plane only, reproducing the effects of gravity.  This is beneficial to the older generation or those recovering from injury.  Vibrational models also allow patients to experience higher Hz ranges to allow higher tolerances and more systemic and cellular benefits.  WBV therapy machines typically range from 3 to 50 Hz.  (The hertz  – symbol Hz – is the SI unit of frequency defined as the number of cycles per second of a periodic phenomenon.[1] One of its most common uses is the description of the sine wave, particularly those used in radio and audio applications.)    

What does whole body vibration do to the body?  WBV increases physical strength, dexterity and endurance.  It also increases circulation and oxygen uptake.  The mechanical oscillations create tendon stretch reflexes to stimulate involuntary muscle contractions throughout the body.  

One session of 10 minutes on the WBV takes less effort and time, boosting muscle strength, doing the same movements that are done in a one-hour workout in the gym.  The WBV is of benefit to those with balance or coordination issues in a safe environment.  

If you would like to schedule a session for yourself or a group to learn more about the WBV Technology, contact Gerry at 801-358-4777 with Healthy Life Institute.  

[1] ^ “hertz”. (1992). American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 3rded. Boston: Houghton Mifflin.

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